Monday, December 27, 2010

Comprehensive View of K-12 Educators' E-book Usage, Attitudes and Intent to Purchase

A comprehensive survey of K-12 educators shows that school librarians are leading the way in bringing E-books into our nation's schools - in large part because, unlike classroom teachers, they have funding available to them to support their E-book purchases.

The study, written by John Fredricks, Ph.D., former Director of Global Market Research at Reader's Digest, shows that 40% of K-12 teachers and 50% of school librarians have purchased E-books for either personal or professional use. Of the K-12 educators who bought E-books for professional purposes, however, 70% of teachers say they funded the purchases with their own money, while only 8% of school librarians reported paying for the E-books out of their own pockets.

These findings are but a small part of the detailed data generated from a survey conducted among 700 K-12 teachers and 600 school librarians, the results of which appear in the newly published report, eBooks: K-12 Educators' Usage and Attitudes. The survey was fielded by educational consulting firm Egremont Associates, with support from co-sponsors edWeb.net, MCH Strategic Data and TecKnoQuest Inc.

"Before we conducted this study," said Neal Goff, President of Egremont Associates, "the most basic information about K-12 educators' usage of E-books in schools and attitudes towards them didn't seem to be available anywhere. We believe this survey provides more information about how K-12 educators use E-books, what they think of them, and what their future purchase plans are than any other study yet conducted."

In addition to providing data about K-12 educators' E-book purchases and usage patterns, and non-buyers' future purchase plans, the study includes extensive quotes from educators describing what they do with E-books in their classrooms and what their students think of them.

"I was really struck by the fact that the teachers who have bought E-books expressed such positive attitudes about them," said Lisa Schmucki, founder and CEO of edWeb.net, a professional social network for the education community. "Not all educators have gotten on board the E-book train, but those who have seemed very happy with the experience."

Download a free executive summary of the report at http://www.dedicatedteacher.com/ebooksurvey.

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